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The Hully Gully Trope June 19, 2013
 icon of the festival
The idea to use the zoetrope came from the icon of the festival itself We are part of the organizing team of the Beirut Animated festival, and we decided to do activities in the city. The aim was to get as many people as possible interested in animation.

We had a bunch of ideas, but finally we decided to do a zoetrope, a device (traditionally very small) that produces the illusion of motion from a rapid succession of static pictures. The idea to use this device came from the icon of the festival itself. Every year they choose something to represent the festival, and this year it was the Hully Gully (in Arabic we call it 3arousat el Manara,) in Luna Park, Rawcheh.

While we were brainstorming we thought of the Hully Gully, and thought, ‘what can we do with a rotating object,’ linking it to animation. In our minds it was so obvious, a zoetrope was such a simple way to link it. When we first came up with the idea it seemed so simple but, on a huge scale, everything changed, all the calculations.

Our first challenge – it’s going to get a bit technical! – was to understand how many images you need to actually see a loop on camera. Basically, at the beginning we went there like fools with 20 images. We thought: there are 20 booths, so we’re just going to put 20 images, and of course we’ll see it! Yes, the camera did see it, but it was so blurry. Wishful thinking!

We contacted an expert in zoetropes called Jim Le Fevre, who was very helpful. I contacted him and asked him about the formulae we needed in order to get to the right number of images. The rotation of the actual Hully Gully is important. From our original 20, we have ended up with 84 images.

The second challenge was to make this event interactive. The first layer of interactivity stems from the inability of the naked eye, without divisions in between each image, to see the moving image without a blur, because of something called the persistence of vision. You need either a camera or you need something that simulates shutter speed. So, we built a structure to simulate shutter speed, where the people turn it and try to find the right speed so that they are able to see the animation more smoothly.

We thought of another layer of interactivity, coming from the animation itself – we’re using Velcro. We stuck it onto the cardboard and we are using colored paper cups. They will have Velcro on them too, so people can come and stick the cups to a certain curve. Once all the cups are in place, we hit the Hully Gully, it revolves, and people can see the loops that they themselves have created. We have a camera with the right shutter speed, the right frames per second, which will project onto a big screen whatever is happening.

When we started researching about large scale zoetropes, we came across very few. None of them were done with actual, existing objects that you can build on. We were kind of surprised that this was actually a unique thing that we’re doing. We would love to take it as far as possible. We have an idea to develop it into a film, with more of an elaborate storyline, but all done on a zoetrope. After this project, we’d love to apply for a fund and develop this properly.

The project has taken us a month and a few weeks. It was really quick – such good ideas always come at the end! It has been a bit frantic, we’ve worked on it non-stop.

Luna Park has been amazing. They’ve let us use it any time we like, and they’re not even charging us! They have these good intentions, so a big thanks to them!
The controls
84 images
structure to produce a manual shutter speed
The controls At the beginning we went there like fools with 20 images, but the image was too blurry. From our original 20, we have ended up with 84 images. We created a structure to produce a manual shutter speed that you can look through in order to see it
structure to produce a manual shutter speed
We created a structure to produce a manual shutter speed that you can look through in order to see it
Luna Park
Luna Park has been amazing
Velcro
So, we thought of a different way to make it interactive – we’re using Velcro.
graphic element
camera
The graphic element: colored paper cups. People can come and stick the cups to a certain curve. We have a camera with the right shutter speed, the right frames per second, which will project onto a big screen whatever is happening.
graphic element
The graphic element: colored paper cups. People can come and stick the cups to a certain curve.
graphic element
The graphic element: colored paper cups. People can come and stick the cups to a certain curve.
hully gully
Once all the cups are in place, we hit the hully gully, it revolves, and people can see the loops that they themselves have created. All images courtesy of Joan Baz and David Habchy Joan Baz and David Habchy are Beirut-based visual artists, animators, and illustrators. In a guest contribution to NOW, they talk about how they have turned the Hully Gully, or Spinning Bride,
in Luna Park, into a giant zoetrope.
Head down to Luna Park Wednesday, June 19, anytime between 4 and 7.30pm and watch the bride spin. JOAN BAZ & DAVID HABCHY
  • sedki.alimam

    creative project <3

    June 20, 2013